27 Easy Questions to Prepare for Confession According to Fr. Larry Richards’ Speech on Confession

During Fr. Larry Richards’ speech on Confession he mentioned how anyone who didn’t know what their sins were in confession could just ask him for these easy questions. By the end, they would have a pretty good idea what their sins were. At the end of the speech, Father quickly rattled them off. After being reminded of their sins, I’m sure some people were ready to go to confession immediately after the speech ended. Anyways, I thought this list would be a good reference for others. I reordered the questions and polished it up slightly compared to the list given in the speech. It’s just an examination of conscience. You can find several of these online, but maybe this one is right for you. God works in mysterious ways.

Warning: According to the speech, Fr. Larry primarily works with college students, so he is very frank in these questions. Some of the language or wording may be inappropriate for children. Parents should review this list before handing it over to their children. You probably don’t want to explain some of these things to young children. 🙂

27 Easy Questions to Prepare for Confession

  1. Do you pray every day?
  2. Have you used God’s name in vain?
  3. Have you missed mass?
  4. Have you dishonored your parents?
  5. Have you gotten angry?
  6. Have you hurt others with your words?
  7. Have you made fun of others?
  8. Have you lied?
  9. Have you cheated?
  10. Have you gossiped?
  11. Have you been jealous?
  12. Have you been judgmental?
  13. Have you been proud?
  14. Do you consistently give to the poor?
  15. Have you gotten drunk?
  16. Have you gotten high?
  17. Have you had impure thoughts?
  18. Have you had impure actions with yourself?
  19. Have you looked at pornography?
  20. If not married, have you had oral sex with another?
  21. If not married, have you had intercourse with another?
  22. If married, did you commit adultery?
  23. If married, have you used artificial birth control?
  24. Have you had sex with someone of the same sex?
  25. Have you had an abortion?
  26. Have you helped someone else have an abortion?
  27. Are you sorry?

For a more detailed list, refer to the Sins List [PDF] from Fr. Larry’s Reason For Our Hope Foundation. You can also purchase a recording of his speech from that same website.

May God bless you with his abundant grace,
Jared

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What is Good Prayer?

You can’t live a good, holy life without consulting God on a regular basis. Prayer is the primary way we receive guidance and support from God (CCC 2566, 2611), so it’s super important to have a good prayer life. If you don’t, you will slowly move in a different direction than God, possibly wandering far away from where God wants you. If your prayer life is not doing well, you will get tired of prayer and likely abandon it. If your prayer life is doing great, you will look forward to prayer everyday and can’t imagine life without it. This is achieved through good prayer.

Good prayer is peaceful, relaxed, and easy. There is no effort involved. When you have a stressful day, you look forward to your prayer to calm you down. Good prayer warms the heart. Whether dealing with depression or sorrow, you feel the love of God in your prayer. No matter how bad you feel when you start, you always feel better after. Good prayer is desirable. When you forget to pray or don’t have the time, you feel something missing in your life. You look forward to your prayer time every day after work. Good prayer is meaningful. You’re mind isn’t blank when you pray. It is full of hopes, dreams, love, sadness, anger, and a deep longing to be with God. Good prayer is revealing. During prayer you unveil the depths of your soul to God and God unveils part of his essence, an insight that leads to a deeper understanding of your Creator. Good prayer is such a wonderful gift from God, but how do you get there?

The keys to good prayer are trusting God, understanding how you relate to God, and having a dedicated time and place for prayer. You have to trust that God exists and is listening when you pray (CCC 2609-2610). For new believers, prayer many times feels empty or stale. It takes time and dedication to become sensitive to the presence of God. Some people will hear the voice of God, but this is extremely rare. Most people only have the “feeling” of God, and it’s usually only barely perceptible in prayer. The closer you get to God, the more sensitive you are to his presence. Very holy people feel God throughout the day in everything they do.

If you start a new prayer habit, do not give up if you don’t feel like the prayer is doing anything. Just keep praying. Eventually, you will start to feel something (CCC 2613). It probably won’t be every time you sit down to pray. Unfortunately, on earth God will always be distant. Most people will barely feel God even after years of prayer, but occasionally you will have a really intense prayer session. Those times you are blessed with a small taste of what heaven will be like, something to look forward to after your resurrection.

Trusting God is important to good prayer, but it’s also important to understand how to you relate to God. As Creator of all the living, God is the father of everyone. Just as a child learns from his or her father or asks him for help, we as adults learn from God and ask him for help (CCC 2564). Remember when you were growing up at home and how you interacted with your father. Hopefully, you had daily communication with your father. That is how your relationship should be with God in prayer (CCC 2565). If you’re father was missing or emotionally absent, God can fill in as the perfect father.

When you talk to God in prayer, it should be the same as how you talk to a best friend, close relative, or spouse. You should be comfortable saying anything on your mind and not worry about being made fun of or taken advantage of. You should speak from the heart, not from a script. When talking to a human you can congratulate them, look up to them, thank them, ask them for something, give them something, or talk about others with them. All of these ways of communicating work pretty much same with God through the prayers of praise, adoration, thanksgiving, petition, offering, and intercession (CCC 2626-2643). The best part about prayer is that God is perfect. Even people we really trust on earth can sometimes treat us badly, but God is perfectly good. He will never do anything to harm us, so we can always look to prayer for a deep conversation with the Father we love.

Lastly, you need to get away from others in a quiet place for good prayer to happen (CCC 2602). Similar to how kids spend times with their parents as a group and one-on-one, every Catholic needs some alone time with God. This is where those deepest prayers can happen. To prevent other people from barging in on your time with God, you will probably have to dedicate certain times of the day for prayer. This might be in the morning before others get up or at night after everyone has gone to bed. Maybe the home is too chaotic, so you have to go to a nearby park, church, or some other peaceful place away from others. Whatever you choose, you have to get away from distractions to be able to pray deeply.

Good prayer is something that has to be worked on, but the reward is invaluable to Catholic life. Going from a life alone to a life with God is night and day. You will go from a shallow and dull life to a life full of meaning and purpose. It’s all through continued good prayer. I am a cradle Catholic who has prayed for decades, but I still continue to improve my prayer every year. The reward for this effort has been a deeper and deeper relationship with God as the years go by. It is just so comforting and pleasing throughout the day being with God. Some days I suffer a lot or people treat me badly, but it just doesn’t bother me much because I am with God. You, too, can have this peace and support if you work on good prayer a little every day.

May God bless you with his abundant grace,
Jared

The Way God Works

Since we humans were created in the image of God (Gen 1:26-27), there are many parallels between us and God. One such parallel is how God and humans work. When work has to be done, we humans either do the work ourselves or instruct another person to do the work. God is no different. When God wants something to happen, he can do the work directly through miracles (Ex 24:12) or he can instruct his creation (angels, saints, and humans on earth) to do the work (Ex 3:2 for angels, Phil 2: 12-13 for humans). This truth has a few implications for Catholics.

When asking for help from God in our prayers, don’t be surprised if help comes in a different way than expected. Here the Catholic has some need they want God to address. Maybe they prayed for healing but no healing came. It’s possible God is going to work through a doctor, so God’s answer to the prayer is to see a doctor. Maybe another time they need comfort after a death in the family. It’s possible God is seeking to help them through their friends and family. In these moments it can feel like God is not helping, like he doesn’t care about our problems. God is actually helping; he is just choosing to help through our fellow humans.

Another case is when asking for guidance of what to do with our gifts. A Catholic might pray and pray for choosing how to serve in their community or which of their skills to foster and grow in. God could, of course, give them a straight answer in their heart or mind, but many times he will work through our fellow humans. Maybe the person sees an ad in the parish bulletin for a service opportunity, or maybe someone they’re talking to happens to mention a need they can help with. God has answered their prayer through one of his children.

The unfortunate side of the way God works is that it is hard to tell how God is working in our lives. We can get the feeling that humans are the ones doing everything, and God is not present. This is dangerous thinking. Satan has lured many Catholics away by encouraging doubt in their minds (CCC 215). Whenever you feel discouraged, always remember that the source of all love is God. Whether your prayers are answered directly by God or by someone here on this earth, it ultimately came from God. In this way, you can attribute everything to God and always maintain strength in your faith.

One last point is that God does not have to work. He could answer a prayer request with a simple “no”. Sometimes it is best if we find our own solution to a problem. He has given humans great intellect (CCC 286, 1955), with the ability to learn new things, precisely for this purpose. In these times we might feel all alone, but there is a very good reason that God sometimes decides to just watch from afar. We will not become saints automatically. Our faith must be continually tested to grow in holiness and open the path to sainthood (Jas 1:2-4).

If God solved all our problems, we would never have to face difficulty, never grow in holiness, never become saints, and worst of all, never be with God in heaven. For heaven to be an option, we must face obstacles and overcome them. Each time you make it through a tough situation, you become stronger in the faith. After enough struggles, you will have reached the point where you salvation is secured (2 Tim 4:6-8). God has won you over for all eternity. Having this on your mind during the struggles in life will provide continual relief. No matter how bad this time is, keep up the good work because you are inching toward eternal paradise.

May God bless you with his abundant grace,
Jared

What Being Catholic Means to Me

I was born into a Catholic family, but I really just went through the motions when it came to practicing the faith. I learned about religion in school, and my regular family activities involved going to church and receiving the Sacraments. I liked to please everyone, so I did what my teachers and parents wanted. Entertainment was what drove me though. Early on, it was toys like action figures and Legos, later it was movies and video games. I didn’t really care about anything but having fun. This remained the same until I graduated from college.

By this time video games had become my favorite source of fun. There was an endless amount of new games coming out, and I wanted to play them all. All my plans and goals were centered around games. I had lists of what I had done in existing games and what I wanted to do in the future with those games. I also had lists of all the future games I wanted to get and the things I wanted to do in them. In short, all I cared about was short term pleasure. When I got bored with one game, I always had another lined up to keep me entertained. This kept me busy in the moment, but one day I just felt like I needed to be doing more.

Since the only other thing I did regularly besides video games was go to church, I decided to focus on the Catholic faith. I immediately saw many ways to improve myself. While working on improvement goals, I became aware of the power of prayer. I also discovered that there was an endless amount of studying I could do about the faith. In addition to the Bible, there were countless writings by the Popes, Church Fathers, Saints, and fellow lay Catholics I could read and think about.

Just like there was always another video game to play, there was always another way to improve myself, another prayer to say, or another Catholic work to study. Unlike video games, which was just about short term pleasure, these activities were about the long term. These things would contribute to my salvation or the salvation of others. Going to heaven is a big deal, so these activities were all important. That made me really happy. I didn’t really know what I was looking for when I started focusing on the Catholic faith, but I found it. I was looking for purpose in my life.

Being Catholic means being part of something bigger than myself. This purpose drives all of my actions. I do have free time, where I just do what I want, but a lot of times I am thinking about how I can help myself or others get to heaven. I realize my actions can have a huge impact, mostly on myself but also on the few other people I am able to interact with during my life. I can’t be Jesus and help everyone, but I can help just a few people. All of my actions contribute to Jesus’ overall mission of saving souls.

Being Catholic means being part of a family. At the local level, I have my parish family that continually prays for all the needs in our community. At the national level, I have the U.S. clergy that are all working towards improving the sanctity of the country. At the global level, I have the Church in Rome directing the world towards holiness. Finally, there is the Communion of Saints at the spiritual level that encompasses everything. All of God’s children have a unique connection to each other, especially during prayer. I have all these people pulling for me to get to heaven. I am never alone. In addition, I always have a good friend to talk to in God.

Being Catholic means losing a lot of worries. I don’t have to wonder what I should be doing. I still have free will to decide how I will seek holiness for myself or others, but I always know right from wrong. I know what will lead me to holiness and what will hold me back. The faith allows me to ignore many useless short term things and focus on the things that have meaning in the long run. I don’t have to worry about death because I believe in eternal life. Just as a child goes through puberty to become mature, a person must go through death to go to heaven. I don’t have to worry too much about the future. I only have to make sure I am doing good in the present. The future will work itself out.

Being Catholic means understanding what true love is. It’s not about what I am getting out of the situation. It’s what I can do for others. I might not get anything in return during this life, but it will all be rewarded in heaven. God will give me something for my good actions. True love is sacrifice. That doesn’t mean I have to kill myself to help others, but I do need to be regularly expending energy for others in some way. It means always being able to love others even in the worst of times.

Being Catholic also means having high standards. The way of Jesus is very hard. I can’t just go through life doing whatever I want. I constantly work to avoid sin. Until I die I will never be able to truly rest. There are times when avoiding sin is easy, which can function as a time of rest, but avoiding sin is mostly a constant battle. In addition to avoiding sin, I also have to find opportunities to serve others. I can’t just keep to myself. I have to give back in some way. I push myself as much as I can with these things. Sometimes I work too hard on these things and have to force myself take breaks. This always reminds me of my human weakness, which I look forward to overcoming when I am purified in purgatory.

Despite how hard it is being Catholic, I absolutely love the faith. In good times and bad, it always keeps me going. I might not know exactly what God wants me to be doing, but I know what actions are good. I know the possible choices. Life is a lot easier without the pressure to make all these decisions alone. God and the Church are there helping me. Some days I’m more interested in the faith than others, but I never get truly bored. A lot of times I will be having a lot of fun with some entertainment, but it eventually ends. I become bored with it. That doesn’t happen with the faith. There is always something meaningful to do related to my Catholic faith.

No matter how secular the world becomes, I will never leave the faith. I love it too much. As long as I live, I will be doing my best to become a saint and help the people around me to do the same. Some of those efforts will be through this website, and some will be in other areas of my life, but I will always be participating in Jesus’ mission to save souls.

May God bless you with his abundant grace,
Jared