My Favorite Saints

Throughout history the lives of saints have became great examples of holiness for us. Since every person is unique, every saint has their own unique personality, traits, successes, and struggles. Because of this, every person has saints they will identify with more than others. The beauty of asking the saints to pray for us is that they can pray even when we cannot, whether it be during sleep, because we forgot, when we’re too busy, or any other reason. A few years back, I did some research and got a list of saints that could understand my struggles and know best what I need from God. Now I ask them most days to pray for me. Below are my favorite saints and the reasons I picked them.

Mary, Mother of God

  • Purity/Holiness: Most Catholics pray to Mary so this shouldn’t be surprising. Next to Jesus, she is the only human without sin. I really look up to Mary’s purity. While I am doing fairly well fighting sin these days, that wasn’t always the case. I used to love sins like obsessively playing video games and staying up late every night. Mary’s example inspires me to love goodness and hate sin.
  • Obedience: Mary had the huge responsibility to raise Jesus, doing her part to follow God’s plan. While God’s plan for my life is not as important, he still does have a plan. I need to obediently follow his plan just as Mary did.
  • Suffering: When Jesus suffered on the cross, Mary also suffered. Like Jesus, she had no guilt and could have gone straight to heaven but instead chose to follow her Son and die. Mary has an intimate knowledge of suffering and death, so she understands what I’m going through whenever I have to suffer.
  • Closeness to God: Mary was with Jesus at both the beginning and end of his life, so there is a deep connection between them. She is much closer to Jesus than I am. In praying to Mary, Jesus’ own mother is praying for me. Our Queen-Mother wants to pray for us and make requests of the King, if only we will ask.

St. Joseph

  • Purity/Holiness: St. Joseph wasn’t perfect and without sin like Mary but still led a very good life. Because I am a man, I can relate to him more than Mary. Whenever I am not sure how to be a holy man, I can ask him to pray for me.
  • Obedience: Like Mary, St. Joseph had a particular strength in obedience to God’s will. When God told him (through the angel) to continue with his marriage to Mary despite her pregnancy, Joseph obeyed. That required a lot of trust in God. Joseph had first hand experience with obedience and trusting in God, so his prayers can help me to obey and be able to trust God.
  • Perfect Husband: While Jesus is the perfect man, he did not marry. Our example of the perfect husband is thus St. Joseph. He showed how a man should treat a woman, not as property or an object but as priceless child of God. He showed how a man should raise children, especially education in the faith. I am not married and don’t have children, but I want to always show the utmost respect towards women and always be a good example towards the children I encounter. If I find myself called to marriage in the future, St. Joseph will be even more important.
  • Chastity: Even though Mary and St. Joseph were married, they lived in continence. They dedicated their lives to Jesus by practicing abstinence so that no other children would distract them from doing their best for Jesus. As a single man, I have to deal with the normal attractions all men deal with, but I also have to practice abstinence to remain chaste. It is good to have St. Joseph praying for me when I have temptations.

St. Aloysius Gonzaga

  • Suffering: St. Aloysius suffered a lot during his life with kidney disease, skin disease, headaches, and insomnia. He also had to suffer with the plague that eventually took his life. Despite his sufferings, he always did his best. While my sufferings are probably not as bad as St. Aloysius’ sufferings, I do suffer a little most days. Just like him, I have to do the best I can even when I feel bad.
  • Purity/Holiness: St. Aloysius’s had the gift of purity of heart. There was a certain innocence in him from a young age. No doubt the suffering he endured strengthened the virtue of purity within him even more. Though I did sin as a child, I noticed a certain innocence in myself at a young age, finding it easier to follow the rules than other boys. In addition, I have learned my suffering is a way to grow in holiness.
  • Service: St. Aloysius was constantly pushed and pulled between what his family wanted and what his superiors in the order wanted, but he always found a way to serve wherever he was. Many days, I feel pushed and pulled by the world around me and my health but do my best to fit service in whenever I am able.
  • Asceticism: At a young age, St. Aloysius chose the ascetic lifestyle (living simply). Living a simple life is one of my big ideals. Things may change if I am called to marriage, but as long as I am single, I will doing my best to keep my focus on God and not on material things.

St. Therese de Lisieux

  • Suffering: St. Therese suffered at her birth, at her death, and much in between. She was born with enteritis and died from tuberculosis. She suffered anxiety from being bullied at school and depression over her mother’s early death. I suffer with anxiety and digestive problems, two things this saint also dealt with. My sufferings are not as great as hers, which makes her an inspiration and good saint to ask prayers from.
  • Humility: St. Therese was one of the most humble people you could meet. She never took credit for anything she did, always pointing people back to God. I am pretty good at being humble towards people, but sometimes I get into a bad habit of thinking I know more than others. This is a side effect of studying the faith and becoming holier, but I need help fighting this pride.
  • Charity: St. Therese loved others so much, she sought out the people that treated her the worst and loved them even more no matter how they treated her. Like St. Therese I have a giving heart. I am most happy when I am giving to others. It’s something I discovered early in college but never acted on for many years. I ask St. Therese to pray that I stay on the holy path of giving to others. If I can maintain this, I will always be happy.

St. Margaret of Cortona

  • Transformation: In St. Margaret I see a great transformation between sinner and saint. At a young age, she got involved with a lot of men for attention and gifts and soon became a noble’s mistress. After finding the noble murdered she was so shocked, she gave up her evil life and eventually built a new life serving the poor and sick. My life doesn’t have the extreme evil and good of St. Margaret’s, but I did go through my own transformation. One day I felt the call of the Holy Spirit to be a holy man and become a saint. My life now compared to 15 years ago is totally different, a complete transformation.
  • Service: St. Margaret built a hospital for the poor and sick and served for decades. I probably won’t do anything as great as this saint but definitely want to do my best to live a life of service to God and others. There have been several times I got out of the habit of service. I need help from St. Margaret’s prayers to always be serving.
  • Penance: St. Margaret felt so bad about her actions, after her transformation she constantly sought to do penance, many times in extreme ways. My past sinful life wasn’t as bad as hers, but I still feel bad about how I acted in many parts of my life. Now in my prayer and writing, I work to lead others away from sin and to holiness.

St. Thomas Aquinas

  • Study of the faith: St. Thomas had a very sharp mind. He understood complex things easily and also knew how to explain them in simple ways that anyone could understand. This is what I seek to do with my writing. I am always hoping that something I write will be just the thing someone needs to understand the faith and grow.
  • Chastity: Early in his life, St. Thomas’ family tried to stop him from going into religious life by seducing him with a prostitute. The saint was steadfast in praying for chastity and God answered by making him immune to all temptations of the flesh the rest of his life. As a single man, I have to deal with these temptations most days. I have a lot of experience fighting them now, but I can always use more help.
  • Surrender to God: In his last years, St. Thomas experienced a powerful vision that changed his whole outlook on life. He suddenly lost all motivation to complete his life’s work, the Summa Theologica. Just like St. Thomas, God is in control and can always lead me in a completely different direction than I expected. I need to be ready to accept whatever God wills for my life.

St. Augustine of Hippo

  • Study of the faith: As a Doctor of the Church, St. Augustine wrote and preached many foundational elements of the Catholic faith. I won’t be doing something like that, but I do want to be motivated every day to keep studying and learning about the faith. The more I learn, the holier I will become myself, and the more I can teach others.
  • Chastity: St. Augustine really struggled with chastity as a young man. He had several mistresses and famously asked God “Grant me chastity and continence, but not yet.” I haven’t had as much trouble with this as St. Augustine, but I do have to fight temptations a few times each day.
  • Asceticism: St. Augustine came from a wealthy family. He lived a life of luxury and spent a lot of money. After his father’s death, he gained a large inheritance. However, he gave it all up to focus on serving God. I have never had much money, but I still deal with the little tug to be selfish every time I think about giving money. I need help ordering all my desires towards God.

God bless you,


There is only Good and Evil

In our secular society, people like to say there is no white or black, just shades of gray. While this makes sense when talking about complex issues, for which there is no solution that solves every problem, it definitely does not make sense when it comes to morality. There is no gray to God. Every single word, thought, or action is either good or evil. Liberal people like to think every action is gray, so they don’t have to worry about right and wrong. What’s wrong for one person, is right for someone else. This is just not true.

We Catholics have a sense of how good or evil a particular word, thought or action is. For evil actions, we have the doctrine on venial and mortal sin, which gives a clear dividing line between small sins and serious sins (CCC 1854-1855). Even without that doctrine we can get an understanding of a sin’s weight based on the damage it does to the victim. For good actions, how much sacrifice the person has to go through to do the good action gives us a rough idea of how good the action was. A polite thank you doesn’t involve much sacrifice, but a person donating one of their kidneys for a loved one to live is a pretty big sacrifice.

Because of our faith, we can kind of tell roughly how good or evil any word, thought, or action is. From there we can see that there is no gray. Every action is clearly good or evil (CCC 1470, 1732). Some actions might be only a small good, others might only be a small evil, but they are still one or the other. There is no gray. Knowing this means that even some things that seem irrelevant to morality, like watching TV, are either good or evil. If done to excess, watching TV would be evil. If done in moderation, it would be good. Watching TV may only be a very minor good or evil, but it is still one or the other in every instance.

Another thing many secular people believe in is “the end justifies the means”. I already wrote about this in another post, but this false belief states that an evil action is okay if it has a good end (CCC 1753). We Catholics are against this because we can never do evil ever, but secular people consider the overall effect of the action to be gray. They see the evil (black) combine with the good (white) to become gray. The truth is it is only gray when both the means and the end are combined. There was only one action done here though, and that action was evil. No matter what the end was, it was evil, a sin, to do that. The morality of an action must be judged individually. The consequences help determine how good or how evil the action is, but consequences can’t change the morality of the original action (CCC 1755-1756).

It is important for Catholics to analyze their sins and those of others for good and evil. A lot of times people will try to justify their actions by believing in the idea that a word, thought, or action could be gray. It makes them feel better about their sin. Instead, we should be honest with ourselves and others about our failings and admit them. As Bible said, sin should be exposed to the light (Eph 5:11-14). Rather than trying to cover it up with excuses, we should admit the sin and that we are not perfect (humility, CCC 2631). We are still trying to do better. It is much easier to correct ourselves if we are honest about what we need to work on. It’s like those 12 step programs. The first step is always admitting the existence of a problem. No correction can happen until this first step is completed.

This is a good lesson in general for doing well in life. When there is a problem, tackle it as early as possible. Don’t let it linger and fester. Like an infected wound, it will just continue to get worse. We’ve all read stories about a person’s lie getting them deeper and deeper in trouble. This is even more important for sin because sin always leads to more sin. The more the soul gets sin caked on it, the easier it is for the person to commit more sins. Before they know it they can be so covered in dirt, it’s a ton of work to clean up.

May God bless you with his abundant grace,

Being Humble in Our Achievements

It always annoys me when I hear some rich person or amazing athlete bragging about all their success. The reality is that much of their success depends on God. We commonly say “thank you” to people when they help us, but it’s not really the helping we are thanking. We are actually thanking them for making the choice to help us. After all, the action is dependent on the person’s body that God provided them (CCC 41). He picked all the unique genes that gave the person their talents and skills (CCC 814, 913). The person can’t take credit for their talents, only for the good choice they made to help (CCC 311).

When we look at our lives, we should always separate the action from the choice. Only then can we get a good idea of how much credit we deserve. Our whole lives we are constantly cooperating with God to use the body he gave us for good (CCC 323). God gave us the talents; we make the choice. We should never claim that we deserve all the credit for everything we’ve done. And this isn’t even considering other people that may have influenced us.

We may have had friends or family that gave us good advice or motivation. Those people influenced our decisions, so we can’t even take full credit for our decisions. I would guess that in most cases, we can only claim around 25% of the credit for our achievements in life. We owe the majority of what we do to others. Unfortunately, when thinking about achievements, it’s very easy to focus too much on the present. We see all our success and think, “Look at all I did!”. We forget about all the people that helped us along the way. Even worse, we forget that God gave us the capability to do all these things because of the body he gave us.

When thinking about all the progress we’ve made in life, I think it is good practice to force ourselves to acknowledge the others in our lives every step of the way. A huge part of the Catholic faith is focusing on others instead of ourselves. This is called sacrifice, which is part of charity, and charity is another name for love (CCC 2100, CCC 1822). We know that God is love, so we have to embody love too. Avoid having pride in your achievements (CCC 2481, 1 Jn 2:15-16). Always focus on how you were helped by others. Whenever you think about all you’ve done, don’t just think of the main bullet points. Think about all the people that were around you during those moments. When someone gives you credit for an action, be polite and thank them, but make sure to mention the others that helped you.

May God bless you with his abundant grace,