Video Game Thoughts: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is a 2017 action-adventure game by Nintendo that I played on the Wii U. I have greatly enjoyed all of the Legend of Zelda games over the years. I really like the gameplay formula they have. These games tend to focus on story with exploration and puzzles to keep things interesting. Breath of the Wild kept much of this but went in a radical new direction.

For the first time, the world of Hyrule was completely open. Link, the hero, could explore wherever the player wanted, ignoring the story indefinitely if they wanted. The story mostly played out in short scripted sequences every so often, leaving more room for the player to create their own stories in what they chose to do. There was still a core story, a main quest, but this time it was pretty short, maybe 20 hours at the most. The main quest was fun and enjoyable, but it wasn’t the meat of the game. The meat was getting to visit all these amazing lands, defeating enemies, and helping solve the problems of the people that lived there.

In the story, the main characters were still Link, Zelda, and Ganon, but the details were quite different. Usually, the evil Ganon would rise in the lands of Hyrule and it was up to Link, with the help of Zelda, to defeat him. However, when Breath of the Wild started, Ganon had already won 100 years prior. It was a post-apocalyptic world. Link had awakened from a long slumber with the task to defeat Ganon and heal the damage done to the world. Zelda was a much stronger person this time. She ultimately did depend on Link, but she was capable of quite a bit more on her own.

The story wasn’t my favorite part of Breath of the Wild, not because it was bad but because it was such a small part of the game. The vast majority of my time was spent wandering around defeating enemies, finding treasure, and completing side quests. That is what I remember the most. There was a little bit of story interspersed here and there to bring the main quest back to the foreground, but then it was in the background for another 5 hours. That made it hard for me to remember much of it.

I never really felt like I got to know the characters. Unlike Skyward Sword, Link didn’t have any dialog choices. Zelda’s personality was hard to follow since the story sequences were so sporadic. Ganon, in this game, was reduced to a mindless evil monster. The story never moved me like the stories in some of the previous Zelda games. This is just a side effect of a huge open world game though. The main story can never be the main feature; the game world serves that purpose. The game world was perfect in Breath of the Wild.

Breath of the Wild was by far the largest game Nintendo has ever made. The world was absolutely huge. I played around 72 hours to finish the main quest and only fully explored maybe 4 regions out of around 8 regions total. Even then there were side quests I could come back to in those regions along with minibosses I could fight again for more treasure. It was well worth the money just on playtime alone. Playtime is useless if you’re not having fun, but I had tons of fun with this game. The story wasn’t the best, but gameplay more than made up for it.

I have played other open world games, such as The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, but I enjoyed the minute to minute gameplay in Breath of the Wild much more. Games like Skyrim were more fun to make plans for characters or quests and see them through to their outcome. On the other hand, Breath of the Wild was more fun to just wander around and explore with no plans in mind.

There were good incentives to explore. Some places were just there to appreciate the sights, but most parts of the game were filled with interesting content like treasure chests, new sidequests with useful rewards, or these little Korok creatures that helped Link increase his inventory space. Loading times were very minimal, maybe 30 seconds at the most but typically 10 seconds or less. I was really impressed with the gameplay, in particular the combat. The combat was similar to the previous 3D Zelda games, including Ocarina of Time, but much more polished and fluid in Breath of the Wild. No previous Zelda game gave the player as much control in how to fight monsters.

When facing enemy camps there were at least four options to tackle it. Option 1 was just running in and swinging a sword at everything in sight. Option 2 was using the environment like rolling a boulder or shooting a bomb. Option 3 was stealthily defeating enemies one by one. Option 4 was using Link’s “Magnesis” ability to pick up large metal objects to drop on the enemies. Many times there were other options, but these four options were almost always an option. My strategy was usually sneaking in trying to dispatch a few enemies silently before starting regular combat, but other people always used the environment. Once in combat, there were even more choices to make.

In combat, Link could throw bombs or shoot arrows at enemies or fight in close range. In close range, he could block with a shield and attack when the enemy was temporarily stunned or go the more risky two-hand sword without a shield. Another weapon type was the spear that offered great attacking range at the cost of low damage. There were also special Flurry Attacks that could be performed by dodging or avoiding attacks at the right moment. Some people specialized in dodging. I never got the timing down to do it consistently, but it was really fun when I pulled it off. Weapons could also be thrown for double damage. Some weapons like boomerangs even came back after throwing them. Between weapon type, throwing, blocking, dodging, sneaking, and using the environment, there were many different choices to make during combat. This kept things fresh. I was always learning something new throughout the game.

In addition to combat, this Breath of the Wild was great in the area of collecting interesting items. There were always new weapons, shields, armor, and ingredients to find. Armor was nice because it didn’t break like weapons and shields did. I spent a lot of rupees (in-game money) on the unique armor sets. The game was filled with various ingredients in every area. These could be cooked up to make special dishes. Eating these healed Link and usually also gave him a temporary special effect, such as Cold Resistance for staying warm in the mountains. I had a lot of fun cooking up various ingredients to see what special dish it would make.

One small downside here was that Breath of the Wild didn’t have the option to record the recipe, so I could make more hours later. There was a way to inspect a dish and get the list of ingredients, but once Link had eaten all of that dish, I had to go off of memory if I wanted that same dish again. It would have been much better if the game automatically recorded each recipe. Then hours later when I decided to go back into the mountains, I could look through all the recipes and find one that provided that special effect.

With so many useful items, it could be hard track them down after Link had used them. Well, the game had a really nice tracking system that unlocked just a few hours into the game. Once enabled, Link game could point Link in the direction of almost anything in the game from monsters to specific ingredients to even treasure chests. The only requirement was to take a picture of the object found in the wild. After that, it could be tracked. Many objects were unique — tracking would be useless for them — but it was extremely useful for the vast majority of items. To go along with this, the in-game map gave the player the option to place 100 identifying stamps anywhere they wanted. This empowered the player to create their own custom notes on the map for where minibosses, unopened treasure chests, or rare ingredients were.

The Legend of Zelda games are so good almost everyone has a different favorite game in the series. Breath of the Wild was far better than the earlier games in combat and exploration while being a little weak in story and characters. The other games have had their own positives and negatives, such as Twilight Princess‘s focus on story length at the cost of side quests. Regardless, I have enjoyed them all, including this latest installment. Even though I finished the main quest in Breath of the Wild, I covered less than half of the game. For now I am taking a break from daily playing. At my normal rate of around 3 hours a week, there is enough gameplay for several months. By then, the downloadable content will be out for even more fun. As long as the game continues to be fun, there is no doubt I will enjoy the extra content.

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